Meet the Leader Special Edition of the ALF 2016: H.E. Thabo Mbeki

Meet the Leader Special Edition of the ALF 2016: H.E. Thabo Mbeki

Interview with H.E. Thabo Mbeki, Former President of South Africa

Date: July 29, 2016

Guest: H.E. Thabo Mbeki

Interview with H.E. Thabo Mbeki

H.E. Thabo Mbeki

Former President of South Africa

H.E. Thabo Mbeki served as the second post-apartheid President of South Africa from 1999 to 2008. During his tenure in office, President Mbeki was the architect of South Africa's Transition to democratic rule, he was the author of much of the post-apartheid of South Africa's economic, political and social policies; the successor and ‘comrade’ to Nelson Mandela, Oliver Tambo and Govan Mbeki; and the originator of NEPAD (New Partnership for Africa’s Development) that was launched in 2001. His remarkable leadership roles on good governance on the continent, African ownership of, and solutions to Africa’s problems, redefinition of African foreign policy (towards Afro-centric and non-confrontational diplomacy - a rejection of ‘victimhood’ and Afro-pessimism in favor of an Afro-centric, proactive, non-confrontational African engagement in international affairs ), and the ‘African Renaissance Coalition’ combined to create conditions favorable to the emergence of ‘Africa rising’ narrative.

In 2002, Mr. Mbeki served as the founding Chairperson of the African Union. Together with other African Heads of State and Government, Mr. Mbeki pioneered the establishment of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), initiated the establishment of the India, Brazil, South Africa (IBSA) Dialogue Forum.
He contributed to and led many of Africa’s initiatives to end various conflicts on the Continent, including in Liberia, Côte d’Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Lesotho, Zimbabwe, Burundi, and Comoros. He is also the Chairperson of the AU-UN High Level Panel on Illicit Financial Flows from Africa.

In 2010 he established the Thabo Mbeki Foundation and the Thabo Mbeki African Leadership Institute, both focused on the achievement of the goals of the African Renaissance